Sunday, September 17, 2017

Essay: World Building in Video Games



In an attempt to better my writing skills, I've written another essay, a bit longer than my previous work.  This one takes a brief look at the practice of "world building", and how complete immersion into a fantastical universe can be accomplished through the interactive design of video games.  As always, feedback is encouraged.  

Below is an excerpt from the opening paragraphs:

"If you are already well versed in works based in science fiction or fantasy, you may already have a good understanding of the practice of world building.  However, for the sake of clarity, allow me to do a brief recap of some of the basics. A quick google search for "world building definition" offers some very straight-forward results: "World-building is the process of constructing a fictional universe."[1], "The process of constructing an imaginary world."[2], or "The process of creating worlds for use in a fictional tale."[3]. World-building means building worlds. I'm glad we got that sorted out.

What if we broke down this term a little more? The definition of "building" seems a little obvious here, yet looking up the term "world" in the Merriam-Webster Dictionary provides an interesting variety of definitions, one of the more notable of these being "the system of created things"[4]. Given some thought, this seemingly vague and broad definition may actually make the most sense, as the world we live in is more than just the people we meet and the ground under our feet. We have sets of laws (physics, nature, gravity, etc.) that keep the world turning. Most everything has some underlying logic that doesn't quite make sense until it is placed with context. The earth has a rich, diverse history of it's own that can seem almost unreal when considered today; Try to imagine dinosaurs roaming the outskirts of Columbus, Ohio[5], or California at the bottom of the ocean[6].


The history of the earth, paired with these "systems" that are in place, sets the stage for each and every one of our modern-day adventures. We aren't necessarily aware of these systems at all times, but they guide each and every one of our actions. Therefore, it makes absolute sense that artists, writers, directors, and game developers would go to great lengths to create a detailed world outside of our own, with its own rules and history, to better immerse the audience into their stories; a "second world". But just how exactly is this accomplished?"

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